Excellence in bioinformatics is acknowledged through the Bioinformatics Awards, launched by SIB in 2008. The 2021 laureates were announced during the [BC]2 Basel Computational Biology Conference held in September: Heba Sailem received the Early Career Bioinformatician Award ; Stephanie L. Hyland, Martin Faltys, Matthias Hüser, Xinrui Lyu and Thomas Gumbsch jointly received the Swiss Bioinformatics Graduate Paper Award ; and the Bioinformatics Resource Innovation Award went to Nextflow. Predicting gene function, anticipate circulatory failure in intensive care patients, enabling reproducible genomic computation: discover the laureates and their work, recorded as part of a special edition of our ‘in silico talks’ series.

Inference of multi-scale and context-dependent gene functions from genetic perturbation screens

The Early Career Bioinformatician Award went to Heba Sailem, Research Fellow at the Institute of biomedical engineering at the University of Oxford. “Heba received the award in recognition of her outstanding contribution to the field of bioinfoinformatics and bioimaging, and in particular for her design and development of innovative systems for knowledge and context dependent gene function prediction” said the Award Committee. Indeed, genes can have different functions in different contexts: olfactory receptors for instance are useful for smell but are also involved in cancer and its progression. Understanding and predicting this is the aim of the framework developed by Heba Sailem.


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REFERENCE
Sailem H Z et al. KCML: a machine-learning framework for inference of multi-scale gene functions from genetic perturbation screens, Molecular Systems Biology 2020, https://doi.org/10.15252/msb.20199083

 

circEWS: an early warning system for circulatory failure in the ICU

About the SIB Bioinformatics Awards

Started in 2008 as an initiative to distinguish young bioinformaticians in Switzerland, the Bioinformatics Awards have gone a long way since: from a national award to three different prizes today, each with a dedicated jury panel composed of Swiss and international leading scientists, honoring 1) international early career bioinformaticians (Early Career Bioinformatician Award), 2) excellency within the Swiss PhD community (Swiss Bioinformatics Graduate Paper Award) and 3) innovative bioinformatics resources (Bioinformatics Resource Innovation Award).

The Swiss Bioinformatics Graduate Paper Award went to Stephanie L. Hyland (ETH Zurich, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medicine, Zurich University Hospital), Martin Faltys (University Hospital Bern, University of Bern), Matthias Hüser (ETH Zurich, Zurich University Hospital), Xinrui Lyu (ETH Zurich, Zurich University Hospital) and Thomas Gumbsch (ETH Zurich, SIB), part of two teams led by Group Leaders Gunnar Rätsch and Karsten Borgwardt at ETH Zurich. Their paper “Early prediction of circulatory failure in the intensive care unit using machine learning”, published in Nature Medicine and resulting from a cooperation with Inselspital Bern, was singled out by the Award Committee for the “originality of the data, method and application”.

 

Open the video in YouTube to access its description with more information about the speaker, individual chapters, etc.

REFERENCE
Hyland, S.L., Faltys, M., Hüser, M. et al. Early prediction of circulatory failure in the intensive care unit using machine learning. Nature Medicine 2020. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-0789-4

 

About the in silico talks – The latest in bioinformatics by SIB Scientists

The “in silico talks” online series aims to provide bioinformaticians, life scientists and clinicians with the latest advances in bioinformatics methods, research or resources led by SIB Scientists, in a wide range of topics. Would you like to stay abreast of the latest developments, get exclusive insights into recent papers, and discover how these advances might help you in your work or research? Read more and subscribe to the mailing list to receive the next talk.

Nextflow: Flowing in love with data, again and again

The Bioinformatics Resource Innovation Award, recognizing a groundbreaking resource, was “unanimously attributed to Nextflow, a free open-source software to write, create, maintain and deploy data intensive and highly scalable workflows on any infrastructure, (…) omnipresent in bioinformatics and beyond, with more than 8,000 active developers in the world,” said the Awards Committee. The talk was delivered by Cédric Notredame from the Center for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona on behalf of the team that contributed to the development of the tool, which offers a framework for efficient and reproducible genomic computation.

Open the video in YouTube to access its description with more information about the speaker, individual chapters, etc.

REFERENCE
Di Tommaso P, et al. Nextflow enables reproducible computational workflows. Nature biotechnology 2017. https://doi.org/10.1038/nbt.3820