Latest Protein Spotlight: The scent of guile

Because of their inability to move, plants have devised the most elaborate ways of deceiving their environment in order to grow. European maize, for example, is able to synthesize a molecule known as (E)-β-caryophyllene which is released by the plant's leaves and roots in the presence of larvae feeding on them.

July publications

Take a tour of SIB members' latest peer-reviewed articles and conference proceedings

A new approach to unravel genetic determinants of complex and clinical traits

Eleonora Porcu from the SIB Group of Zoltán Kutalik at the University of Lausanne proposes a Transcriptome-Wide Mendelian Randomization method (TWMR) which, applied to 43 complex traits, uncovers hundreds of previously unreported gene-trait associations.

Next generation molecular medicine: unlocking big data for precision oncology and infectious disease

Join the international [BC]2 conference and EMBO meeting at BASEL LIFE from 9–12 September: a unique opportunity for today’s scientists to get insights and share the latest discoveries, resources and approaches to make sense of genomic and health-related “big data” for molecular medicine – from precision oncology to infectious diseases.

Mind the sugars – Of the importance of glycans in vaccine design and viral infection

SIB Group Leader Frédérique Lisacek, glycoinformatician, and Philippe Le Mercier, molecular virologist, present a dynamic view of their recent joint paper on this topic and provide a tour d’horizon of the tools developed at SIB that can be used to understand viral activity in the context of glycosylation.

OMA standalone: resolving difficult phylogenies of non-model species by customizing your ortholog search

A tool, derived from the SIB Resource OMA developed by the team of SIB Group Leader Christophe Dessimoz at the University of Lausanne, allows scientists to analyze their own custom genomes or transcriptomes in combination with publicly available data.

June publications

Take a tour of SIB members' latest peer-reviewed articles and conference proceedings

How the dragon got its frill

The frilled dragon exhibits a distinctive large erectile ruff. This lizard usually keeps the frill folded back against its body but can spread it as a spectacular display to scare off predators. A multidisciplinary team led by SIB Group Leader Michel Milinkovitch at the University of Geneva reports in the journal eLIFE...

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