Tag: genes and genomes

  • 'Draw me a scientist' - an exhibition around the theatre play Genome Odyssey

    First in Geneva at the Musée d'Ethnographie (MEG), then in Paris at the Musée de l'Homme, the theatre play Genome Odyssey invited the public - children in particular - to dive into scientific research and the Aboriginal Australian traditions.

  • "Science Fiction": Discover science in a different way

    Are researchers austere? Is bioinformatics arid? Judge for yourself, with this handsome book published by SIB to mark the Institute's 20th anniversary, thanks to the financial support of many sponsors.

  • A brief history of SIB

    With the creation of the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics in 1998, Switzerland made a historical move and positioned itself as a pioneer in the field of data science.

  • A gene increases the severity of common colds

    Researchers funded by the SNSF have discovered mutations that worsen respiratory infections among children. Their study explains the mechanism involved.

  • A genome under influence: The faulty yardstick in genomics studies and how to cope with it

    References form the basis of our comprehension of the world: they enable us to measure the height of our children or the efficiency of a drug. But when such yardsticks are faulty, doubts are cast on all the measurements that derive from them.

  • A look back on the 13th edition of [BC]2

    Last week, the 13th edition of the Basel Computational Biology Conference, co-organized by SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics and the Biozentrum University of Basel, gathered over 500 participants from all over the globe. Among them,...

  • A thorough ‘catalogue’ of an aggressive type of childhood cancer

    Improving cancer precision therapy requires a greater ability to identify and describe groups of patients who share the same molecular and clinical particularities. An SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics group recently played a pivotal role in...

  • A toolbox to improve genome annotation

    With thousands of prokaryotic genomes newly sequenced each year, solutions for accurately annotating these genomes and thereby providing the basis for uncovering the function(s) of genes and their encoded proteins are urgently needed.

  • Andreas Wagner's group

    What we do In the Evolutionary Systems Biology Group, we study the evolution and evolvability of biological systems at all levels of biological organization, from genes and genomes to biological networks and whole organisms. We develop...

  • Andrzej Stasiak's group

    What we do Using the mathematical concept of knotoids, we were able to characterize the topology of protein structures without the necessity of imposing a closure of analysed protein chains. New simulation approaches permitted us to emulate the...

  • Anna-Sapfo Malaspinas's group

    What we do Ancient and modern DNA research have both entered the genomics era. At the Evolutionary Genomics Group (EGG), we aim to characterize evolutionary processes (genetic drift, natural selection, migration and mutation) while relying on...

  • April Virtual Seminar by Sara Mitri: an interview

    From robots to microbes, a logical stepIf you have a deep understanding of how cells interact, then you can pilot these interactions to the benefit of the cells, the environment or even human health. Sara Mitri - SIB Group Leader at the Department...

  • Bart Deplancke's group

    What we do In the Laboratory of Systems Biology and Genetics (LSBG), we use high-throughput sequencing, single cell genomics, microfluidics, and computational approaches to decipher the regulatory code in Drosophila and mammals with a specific...

  • Bioinformatics, a Swiss pride - 20 years of service to the life sciences and health

    Whether we are retracing the history of our ancestors, designing new drugs or understanding what gives Swiss Gruyère its unique flavour, bioinformatics has become an essential discipline.

  • Cracking the ‘dark matter’ in bacterial genomes

    Bacterial genomes are a treasure trove of information, be it for the development of novel antibiotics or the protection of crops against pathogens. A study, led by the group of SIB’s Christian Ahrens at Agroscope, shows that unravelling those...

  • David Gfeller's group

    What we do In the Computational Cancer Biology Group, our aim is to study the interactions between cancer and immune cells. To this end, we develop machine learning algorithms to analyse large-scale genomics and proteomics data. In particular, we...

  • Decoding the genome of the wheat stem sawfly, a major agricultural pest

    What makes the wheat stem sawfly such a major pest in the grasslands of North America? An international study co-led by SIB researchers at the University of Lausanne unravels its genome...

  • DNA loops and smoke rings have a lot in common

    Why do DNA loops forming different knot types sediment at different speeds? Researchers from SIB, UNIL and EPFL joined forces with Polish colleagues to answer this question.

  • DNA, a (hyper)winding road

    When it comes to packaging large amounts of information into tiny volumes, biology and physics often buddy up to reach creative solutions. The problem is even more complex with DNA, as the compacted information must also remain accessible to the...

  • Emmanouil Dermitzakis receives prestigious award

    SIB’s Group Leader Emmanouil Dermitzakis, Professor of Genetics in the Department of Genetic Medicine and Development (University of Geneva Medical School), was awarded the 2017 Bodossaki Foundation Scientific Award in the field of Biosciences...

  • Emmanouil Manolis Dermitzakis's group

    What we do Our group has a strong interest in population genomics and genetics of complex traits. We use various methodologies to understand the role of genetic variation in phenotypic variation and what fraction of genetic variation is harboured...

  • Erik van Nimwegen's group

    What we do Our main research interest in the Genome Systems Biology (GSB) Group is the study of genome-wide regulatory systems, in order to reconstruct them from high-throughput molecular data, understand and model how they have evolved, and...

  • Evgeny Zdobnov's group

    What we do The group is active in the fields of comparative genomics and shotgun metagenomics. We study molecular evolution, develop approaches to genomics data analyses, and implement computational pipelines. We apply evolutionary models to...

  • Fat, a personal affair

    Thirteen percent of the world's population suffers from obesity. Obesity is a particularly complex multi-factor disease, and the direct cause of common conditions such as diabetes or hypertension, making it a major health issue.

  • From cancer evolution to personalized therapies

    Being able to predict the resistance or sensitivity of a tumour cell to a drug is a key success-factor of cancer precision therapy. But such a prediction is made difficult by the fact that genetic alterations in tumours change dynamically over time...

  • Gauging the completeness of genomics data with BUSCO

    With ever-lowering sequencing costs, genomic sequencing projects have been initiated for a wide range of organisms, but the vast majority of genomes currently exist in the form of draft assemblies.

  • Genome Jumper, a mobile game to explore human diversity

    Why is it some people don't have fingerprints? Or that others are more at risk of gluten intolerance? And what does bioinformatics have to do with all this? Find out with our mobile game Genome Jumper.

  • Genome Odyssey: A theatrical journey through scientific research

    Spearheaded by SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics' Group Leader Anna-Sapfo Malaspinas and in partnership with Group Leader Laurent Excoffier, Genome Odyssey is a theater play inspired by the scientists' recent paper in Nature on Australia’s...

  • How species arise: a mathematical answer

    Predicting when and how species arise is now possible with a new theoretical model using genome-wide data, developed by SIB researcher Simon Aeschbacher and colleagues. The study was published yesterday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of...

  • Jacques Fellay's group

    What we do In the Host-Pathogen Genomics Group, we explore the genetic roots of inter-individual differences in response to infections, with a particular focus on the genomic interactions between pathogens and their human hosts. At the crossroads...

  • June Virtual Seminar by Matt Robinson: an interview

    Predicting diseases, one step aheadOur health depends not only on the genes that Nature dealt us at birth, but also on the environment we evolve in and the kind of life we lead.

  • Mark Robinson's group

    What we do In the Statistical Bioinformatics Group, we develop robust data analysis solutions, including new or improved methods, for the analysis of genome-scale data. We develop statistical methods for interpreting data from high-throughput...

  • Matthew Robinson's group

    What we do We develop and apply statistical methodologies to large human phenotype-genotype datasets, to address long-standing questions in population and quantitative genetics. These have improved the prediction accuracy of disease risk in...

  • Mauro Delorenzi & Frédéric Schütz's group

    What we do In the Bioinformatics Core Facility (BCF), we promote trans-disciplinary collaborations between research teams in medicine, molecular biology, genetics, genomics, statistics, and bioinformatics. In particular, we carry out analyses of...

  • Michael Stadler's group

    What we do Our group is located at the Friedrich Miescher Institute in Basel. We study gene regulation through the analysis and modelling of genome-wide datasets. We collaborate closely with experimental researchers on various biological topics,...

  • Much like the khipu system, DNA knots contain precious information

    Khipu – or knotted strings – were used by several Andean cultures to record information. Similarly, knots in DNA can reveal a lot about the molecule’s 3D organisation...

  • New discoveries on the impact of lifestyle factors & genetic markers on our lifespan

    "Longevity is of interest to us all" this is how Zoltán Kutalik, Group Leader at SIB and Biostatistician at the University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV) and the University of Lausanne (UNIL) begins his publication in Nature Communications.

  • Niko Beerenwinkel's group

    What we do The Computational Biology Group is involved in research and teaching in the areas of computational biology, biostatistics, and systems biology. Our activities include the development of mathematical and statistical models, their...

  • Our annual activity report, the SIB Profile 2018, is out

    The new edition of the SIB Profile celebrates the 20 years of the Institute (1998-2018).

  • Our latest video: ‘Swiss Bioinformatics: more than data’

    Discover the spirit behind Switzerland’s vibrant community of scientists dedicated to making sense out of biological data...

  • Paleogenomics suggest inbreeding avoidance in early humans

    Were our prehistoric ancestors aware of the dangers caused by procreation among close relatives? A study led by an international team of scientists, including SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics Group Leader Laurent Excoffier and his team at the...

  • Philipp Bucher's group

    What we do In the Computational Cancer Genomics Group, we are interested in gene regulation in both healthy and diseased cells. Breakthroughs in genomics technologies have led to the production of large volumes of data that could potentially tell...

  • Richard Neher's group

    What we do Our goal is to understand how evolution works at the molecular level and how organisms adapt to changing conditions through random mutations and recombination. Pathogens provide excellent model systems for studying these processes. We...

  • Robert Waterhouse's group

    What we do The group’s research is focused on elucidating interactions between gene evolution and gene function through developing computational approaches to interrogate evolutionary and functional genomics data. We are developing quantifications...

  • SIB core resources

    A stringent selection process SIB's External Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) is in charge of providing recommendations on the selection of SIB’s core resources every four years. Assessing competitive criteria, including the scientific impact and...

  • SIB Days 2018: Swiss Bioinformatics connected

    Hundreds of SIB Members from across Switzerland came to Biel/Bienne on 26 June to attend the SIB Days – our 2-day internal conference and a unique opportunity for the bioinformatics community to connect.

  • Supercoiling pushes molecular handcuffs along chromatin fibres

    As it squeezes down the chromatin fibre, the cohesin protein complex extrudes a growing loop of DNA - a bit like the quick-lacing system of trail-running shoes. But what is powering the movement of the protein?

  • Sven Bergmann's group

    What we do In the Computational Biology Group, we develop concepts and algorithmic tools for the analysis of large-scale biological and clinical data. We participate in many genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for human traits and have a...

  • The 16 genetic markers that can cut a life story short

    The answer to how long each of us will live is partly encoded in our genome. Researchers have identified 16 genetic markers associated with a decreased lifespan, including 14 new to science.

  • The genome of a 234-year-old oak tree, young as ever

    A study carried out by researchers at the University of Lausanne (UNIL) and the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics has revealed that the genome of an emblematic tree of the University campus, the Napoleon oak, has changed little during its first...