sptlt218Walking down a busy main street a few days ago, from the corner of my eye I saw a teenager rooting rapidly through a wallet he had just pulled out of a girl's backpack. Before I had registered what was going on, a young man approached me to ask where he could catch a bus. Flustered, I told him. In between times, the teenager and the stolen wallet had disappeared. Minutes later, I realised what had just occurred. The young man who had asked me about a bus had - successfully - diverted my attention from what his accomplice was doing. This is very similar to the kind of lure a plant pathogen known as Phytophthora sojae uses to confound soybean's immune response to infection. P.sojae secretes a protein known as XEG1 into the soybean plant where it can do significant harm. Soybean, however, reacts to the infection and muffles the effects of XEG1 thanks to a protein known as GIP1. To bypass this inconvenience, P.sojae promptly secretes a second protein - XLP1 - that soybean GIP1 mistakes for XEG1. XEG1 is then free to continue infection while the plant's immune system is tricked to attend to XLP1. This is a perfect example, in Nature, of two entities working together to confound a third. Read more