sptlt214Life strives on reproduction. Over time, it has found very imaginative ways to proliferate in multitudinous forms - from protozoa wriggling in the bottom of pools to big cats racing across the African plains and birds flying swiftly through the air. All forms of life - or certainly the great majority - require help of some sort to reproduce: mammals need a partner, plants rely on insects for pollination and many amphibians are dependent on favourable conditions for spawning. There are life forms, too, that not only count on others to multiply but also damage them in the process, frequently to the extent of killing them. This is the realm of infection. Though their ultimate aim is not to kill their hosts, pathogens such as viruses, bacteria or fungi invade other organisms to take advantage of their resources - so doing, if left unchecked, they can destroy their hosts. In this way, the AIDS virus diminishes our immune cells, the poliovirus attacks our motor neurons and a variety of fungi infect plant cells, ultimately wiping out complete crops. One such fungus is Phytophthora infestans that invades potato plants in particular. Scientists are slowly unveiling how P.infestans uses potato cells to develop, and which molecules are involved. Notably: a protein known as PexRD54. Read more